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Study finds rich people are more likely to get better sleep

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A new study reveals that the amount of money you have determines how much sleep you get each night.

Researchers found that only 55 percent of those living below the poverty line reported resting for a full seven to eight hours compared to 66.6 percent of adults that make 400 percent more.

Experts in the field suggest that those sleeping less are working longer shifts or have multiple jobs due to their lack of financial security.

On the other hand, wealthy individuals can afford to live in quieter areas or purchase larger homes.

Researchers found that only 55 percent of those living below the poverty line reported resting for a full seven to eight hours compared to 66.6 percent of adults that make 400 percent more

Researchers found that only 55 percent of those living below the poverty line reported resting for a full seven to eight hours compared to 66.6 percent of adults that make 400 percent more

The survey was conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which deems sleep deficiency a ‘public health epidemic.’

Persons experiencing sleep insufficiency are also more likely to suffer from chronic diseases such as hypertension, diabetes, depression, and obesity, as well as from cancer, increased mortality, and reduced quality of life and productivity,’ reads the CDC website.

The organization surveyed 140,000 Americans between 2011 and 2014 to investigate sleeping patterns.

The results revealed 55 percent of those making $11,670 to $23,850, the poverty threshold, spent seven to eight hours sleeping.

While 66.6 percent with an income of 400 percent more received a full night’s sleep.

Dr. Neil Kline, a sleep physician at the American Sleep Association, told CNN: ‘People with more resources are able to afford homes that are in quieter locations — more space, less people-density and better sound-proofing.’

Experts in the field suggest that those sleeping less are working longer shifts or have multiple jobs due to their lack of financial security. On the other hand, wealthy individuals can afford to live in quieter areas or purchase larger homes

Experts in the field suggest that those sleeping less are working longer shifts or have multiple jobs due to their lack of financial security. On the other hand, wealthy individuals can afford to live in quieter areas or purchase larger homes

‘People with more resources can also afford more healthcare when it relates to sleep disorders.’

Sleeping has been one of the major issues during the current coronavirus pandemic.

However, during this event people are sleeping longer while under lockdown recommendations, but the quality has dropped significantly.

Researchers from the University of Basel surveyed 435 individuals between 23 March and 26 April 2020 on how the lockdown has influenced their sleep cycles.

A primary reason for this, researchers say, is a lack of ‘social jetlag’.

Social jetlag is a term used to describe the tiredness and fatigue brought on by burning the candle at both ends and sacrificing sleep in order to spend time with friends and family.

Under normal conditions, such as before the pandemic, people normally sleep far more on weekends than they do during the working week.

However, lockdown has eradicated social jetlag and therefore, sleeping cycles have become more consistent over the course of seven days.

Cognitive neuroscientist Christine Blume, who led the research, said: ‘Usually, we would expect a decrease in social jetlag to be associated with reports of improved sleep quality.’

‘However, in our sample, overall sleep quality decreased.

‘We think that the self-perceived burden, which substantially increased during this unprecedented COVID-19 lockdown, may have outweighed the otherwise beneficial effects of a reduced social jetlag.’

HOW TO COPE WITH SLEEP PROBLEMS

Poor sleep can lead to worrying and worrying can lead to poor sleep, according to the mental-health charity Mind.

A lack of shut eye is considered a problem when it impacts on a person’s daily life.

As a result, they may feel anxious if they believe lack of sleep prevents them from rationalising their thoughts.

Insomnia is also associated with depression, psychosis and PTSD.

Establishing a sleep routine where you go to bed and get up at the same time every day can help a person spend less time in bed and more time asleep.

Calming music, breathing exercises, visualising pleasant memories and meditation also encourage shut eye. 

Having tech-free time an hour or so before bed can also prepare you for sleep. 

If you still struggle to nod off, keeping a sleep diary where you record the hours you spend asleep and the quality of your shut eye on a scale of one to five can be a good thing to show your doctor.

Also note how many times you wake in the night, if you need to nap, if you have nightmares, your diet and your general mood.

Sleep problems can be a sign of an underlying physical condition, like pain.

Talking therapies can help your recongise unhelpful thought patterns that might affect sleep.

While medication, such as sleeping pills, can help break short periods of insomnia and help you return to better a sleeping pattern. 

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